Ubuntu is composed of many software packages, the vast majority of which are distributed under a free software license. The only exceptions are some proprietary hardware drivers.The main license used is the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL) which, along with the GNU Lesser General Public License (GNU LGPL), explicitly declares that users are free to run, copy, distribute, study, change, develop and improve the software. On the other hand, there is also proprietary software available that can run on Ubuntu. Ubuntu focuses on usability, security and stability. The Ubiquity installer allows Ubuntu to be installed to the hard disk from within the Live CD environment, without the need for restarting the computer prior to installation. Ubuntu also emphasizes accessibility and internationalization to reach as many people as possible.

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Gource is a software version control visualization tool.

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

See more of Gource in action on the Videos page.
Introduction

Software projects are displayed by Gource as an animated tree with the root directory of the project at its centre.

Directories appear as branches with files as leaves. Developers can be seen working on the tree at the times they contributed to the project.

Currently Gource includes built-in log generation support for Git, Mercurial and Bazaar and SVN (as of 0.29). Gource can also parse logs produced by several third party tools for CVS repositories.

Synopsis.

view the log of the repository (Git, SVN, Mercurial and Bazaar) in the current path:

gource

Requirements.

Gource's display is rendered using OpenGL and requires a 3D accelerated video card to run.


The Linux Kernel.

A snapshot of a flurry of development on the Linux project.

As Linux is a huge C language project, the files being worked on are predominately a mix of .c (shown in green) and .h header files (in red).


Screenshots








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DVDStyler is a cross-platform free DVD authoring application for the creation of professional-looking DVDs.

Saturday, January 28, 2012

DVDStyler is a cross-platform free DVD authoring application for the creation of professional-looking DVDs.

It allows not only burning of video files on DVD that can be played practically on any standalone DVD player, but also creation of individually designed DVD menus.

DVDStyler is a crossplatform DVD Authoring System.

DVDStyler project is free software distributed under GNU General Public License (GPL).

Download.

  Source code: DVDStyler-2.0.1.tar.bz2 (2.7 MB), wxsvg-1.1.2.tar.gz (645 KB)

Features.
  •     create and burn DVD video with interactive menus.
  •     design your own DVD menu or select one from the list of ready to use menu templates v1.8.0.
  •     create photo slideshow.
  •     add multiple subtitle and audio tracks.
  •     support of AVI, MOV, MP4, MPEG, OGG, WMV and other file formats.
  •     support of MPEG-2, MPEG-4, DivX, Xvid, MP2, MP3, AC-3 and other audio and video formats.
  •     support of multi-core processor.
  •     use MPEG and VOB files without reencoding, see FAQ.
  •     put files with different audio/video format on one DVD (support of titleset).
  •     user-friendly interface with support of drag & drop.
  •     flexible menu creation on the basis of scalable vector graphic.
  •     import of image file for background.
  •     place buttons, text, images and other graphic objects anywhere on the menu screen.
  •     change the font/color and other parameters of buttons and graphic objects.
  •     scale any button or graphic object.
  •     copy any menu object or whole menu.
  •     customize navigation using DVD scripting.

Links.

Requirements:

· wxGTK >= 2.4.2
· dvdauthor >= 0.6.10
· MJPEG Tools
· MPEG toolbox (mpgtx)
· Xine multimedia player (optional, for preview)
· Totem movie player (optional, for generation of thumbnails)

Screenshots.






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    Hgview is a simple tool aiming at visually navigate in a Mercurial repository history.

    Friday, January 27, 2012

    Hgview is a simple tool aiming at visually navigate in a Mercurial repository history..

    It is written in Python with quick and efficient key-based navigation in mind, trying to be fast enough to be usable for big repositories.

    Features.

    • easy key-based navigation in revisions's history of a repo (with browsing history) [qt4, text],
    • basic support for mq patch queues [qt4, text],
    • automatically refresh the displayed revision graph when the repository is being modified (commit, pull, updates, etc.) [qt4, text]
    • display current working directory as a special node in the graph (when there are local modifications) [qt4, text],
    • view a graphical side-by-side diff for a given file, allowing to easily compare any couple of revisions for a file [qt4]
    • view the revision graph for a file (filelog) [qt4],
    • navigate in the manifest at any chosen revision (without modifying the working directory) [qt4],
    • basic support for the bfiles extension [qt4, text],
    • search in the whole history (search in diff contents and commit messages) [qt4],
    • directly go to a given revision (can be any understood revision format; rev number, ID, tag, brnch name, etc.) [qt4, text]

    Installation.

    Debian and Ubuntu user can get the latest stable version using the logilab's debian repository. Note that a hgview package is available in Debian testing repositories.

    You may also retrieve the lastest version of the code using Mercurial, typing:

    hg clone http://hg.logilab.org/hgview
    To test it, just go in the hgview directory and type:

    ./bin/hgview
    or run the command, also from the hgview directory:

    hg --config extensions.hgext.hgview=hgext/hgview.py qv
    If you like it, just add in the [extensions] section of your ~/.hgrc:

    [extensions]
    hgext.hgview=/path/to/hgview/hgext/hgview.py

    You can choose your prefered interface in the [hgview] section:

    [hgview]
    interface = qt # or raw or curses

    Dependencies.

    hgview depends on several third-party python packages:

    python 2.5
    Mercurial 1.1

    For the qt4 based interface:

    pyqt4 with qscintilla
    PyQt4 dev tools are also required to run it from sources, which may require the installation of a specific package; on Debian/Ubuntu, the package pyqt4-dev-tools must be installed.

    For the text based interface:

    urwid (console user interface library)
    pyinotify (automatically refreshing)
    pygments (syntax highlighter)

    Screenshots.






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    What distinguish GRhino from most other Othello games is that GRhino will be targeted for experienced Othello players.

    Sunday, January 22, 2012

    GRhino, or Rhino its former name, is an Othello/Reversi game on Linux and other UNIX-like systems as long as GNOME 2 libraries are installed.

    It is currently under development and a new version is available occasionally. The latest version is 0.16.1. You can download it here. (list of changes)

    What distinguish GRhino from most other Othello games is that GRhino will be targeted for experienced Othello players. Strong AI is the main focus with some additional good, useful features (like an endgame solver) is planned. The ultimate target strength of the AI is that it should be able to beat the best human player at the highest difficulty level. Beating Logistello (the strongest program available) is not in the plan :)

    Current Progress.

    Some important AI infrastructure has been finished. Pattern evaluator and open book are mostly done but still requires some further optimization and data file compression. Multi prob-cut to speedup the AI is still missing so it still has a limit on its game strength but this mostly affects playing against other strong AI out there. The main focus for current development is about user interface and features.

    Currently finished parts include:

    -     End game search. It can now solve the exact score (in about 20 sec on P-133) at around 15 empties and Win-Loss-Draw at a slightly higher number of empties.
    -     Move ordering.
    -     Start game from known openings.
    -     Display opening name.
    -     A decent pattern-based evaluation with parity knowledge.
    -     A decent open book with opening variations allowed.
    -     Browse IOS and GGS format game file.

    Features that should be in the version 1.0 release are
    -     Timed game for user (time control for AI is probably implemented later).
    -     Multi prob-cut.

    Features that are probably left out for the short term plan
    -     Think on opponent's time.
    -     Open book, pattern learning.
    -     All sort of advanced stuffs like connecting to GGS, end game solver, browsing Thor database, etc.

    Download.

    Current version is 0.16.1. Only some of the features planned for version 1.0.0 are implemented. The interim AI should be challenging enough for average players. You can see the list of changes between versions of GRhino here.

    This program requires GTK+ 2, GNOME 2, and Pthreads libraries and headers installed. You also need a decent C++ compiler to build GRhino. About 35MB of available RAM is needed by GRhino while running.

    Download grhino-0.16.1.tar.gz
     
    For those with GTK+ and GNOME version 1, you can use the older GRhino 0.9.0.

    Download grhino-0.9.0.tar.gz
     
    Older versions can be download from here.
    Screenshots:

    The screen shot of GRhino 0.15.1 with more buttons on toolbar, choosing small toolbar icon, and no text below icon.


    Game history window showing all previous moves. Clicking on any move display the game board at that stage.

     
    Opening game file from GGS. Note that the text in the Result field varies depending on the game file format.


    Screen Shots of Ancient Versions.

    Version 0.10.0

    The screen shot of main window showing small board graphics, board border and a new toolbar.

    Version 0.9.0

    The screen shot of GRhino 0.9.0 under GNOME 2.


    The screen shot of GRhino 0.9.0 under GNOME 2.

    Version 0.1.0

    This version featuring a new status bar.

    Version 0.0.0

    The first version released.


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    LMarbles is an Atomix clone with a slight change in concept.

    Tuesday, January 17, 2012

    LMarbles is an Atomix clone with a slight change in concept.

    Instead of assembling molecules you create figures out of marbles.

    Nevertheless, the basic game play is the same: If a marble starts to move it will not stop until it hits a wall or another marble.

    To make it more interesting there are obstacles like one-way streets, crumbling walls and portals.

    As Marbles is meant as a puzzle game you play against a move limit and not a time limit. This way you have as much time as you need to think.


    How To Play.
     

    Marbles is very similiar to Atomix and was heavily inspired by it. Goal is to create a more or less complex figure out of single marbles within a time limit to reach the next level.
    Sounds easy? Well, there is a problem: If a marble starts to move it will not stop until it hits a wall or marble.

    There are also some obstacles:

    If a marble moves on such an arrow it will change its direction to the direction the arrow points at. If a marble comes from the direction the arrow points at it will stop before the arrow.

    These yellow and black stripes mean this tile can neither be accessed from these sides nor from the side the arrow points at. So there is only one way to get past this obstacle.

    If a marble encounters such a teleport it will teleport to the second one of the same color and keep on moving in the same direction.

    Such a crumbling wall takes one, two or three hits before it vanishes completely. The number of hits left is displayed by a small digit in the lower right corner of the crumbling wall.

    You play against a move limit and you'll gain the following score when you finished a level:


    DifficultyLevel BonusBonus per remaining move
    Easy50025
    Normal100050
    Hard2000100
    Brainstorm5000250
    You will not gain points twice for the same level!

    If you run Marbles the very first time only one profile (named 'Michael') exists. You probably want to play with a profile named like you. How to create and use a new profile is described in Menu.

    Levels are grouped in chapters and chapters are grouped in levelsets. Right now, Marbles comes with just one levelset called 'Original' containing three chapters with ten levels each. Of course, you can create your own levelsets.


    You have unlimited tries to solve a level! The order in which you solve levels of one chapter does not matter! There are small lights in the right lower corner of the screen of one of the following colors: red(cannot be accessed), orange(can be accessed, not solved yet) and green (already solved, you will not gain any score for solving it again). Just click on a light and confirm to change the level. To enter a new chapter ALL previous levels have to be solved.
     

    Although the interface is quite intuitive you should take a look at the controls.

    Controls.


    • Select a marble: Left-click on it. (You can simply change selection by clicking on another marble)

    • Release a marble: Right-click anywhere.

    • Move a marble: When you selected a marble move the mouse pointer into the wanted direction. If movement is possible the mouse pointer will change into a big arrow pointing into the direction. Then simply left-click.

    • Change the level: As written in 'How To Play' these lights in the right lower corner represent the levels. Simply left-click on a green or orange one and confirm the change. (If you choose the current level (white frame) this will be the same as restarting this level.)
    • Confirm: When you quit, restart or change the level you will be asked to confirm first by pressing 'y' or 'n'. You can do this with left-click(yes) or right-click(no) as well. 

    Important keys:

    • [Escape]: Quits the game after confirmation.
    • [r]: Restarts level after confirmation.
    • [p]: Pauses game.
    • [Space]: If you think your last movement was wrong you can restore the old position by pressing Space as long as the marble did not hit a crumbling wall (can be redefined in options/controls).

    You can use the cursor keys to move a marble (can also be redefined)!


    If your difficulty is 'Training' press a movement key or left mouse button while a marble is moving to 'warp' it to its destination! 

    Creating Your Own Levels.

    As described in 'How To Play' levels are grouped in chapters and chapters are grouped in levelsets. A levelset is a file in Marbles' subdirectory 'levels' without any extension. When finished with the creation you must become root and copy it to the install directory usually /usr/local/share/games/marbles/levels (if you installed marbles).

    That's it. Of course, you must test and change a lot while developing so you should extract Marbles' source somewhere temporary, run configure with the option --disable-install which allows you to work in Marbles' temporary 'levels' directory where you can simply edit and test your levelset. (the 'levels' directory should already contain a file called 'Original').

    Once again step by step:
    • temporarily extract the source somewhere (e.g. /tmp)
    • change to this source directory
    • run './configure --disable-install'; 'make' (do not type 'make install'!!!)
    • change to ./marbles/levels
    • create an empty file without any extension (e.g. 'Brainstorm')
    • edit this file properly (as described below)
    • test it by running Marbles (binary can be found in the parent directory of 'levels')
    • when everything works fine, become root and install it to Marbles' install directory (usually /usr/local/share/games/marbles/levels - of course, you must have installed Marbles before doing this)
    When testing your levelsets you should use a separate profile (e.g. called 'Testing').

    If you start creating a new levelset with, say, ten levels per chapter but you have made only one level so far Marbles will stop parsing the file and ask for confirmation if you try to start this levelset (press 'y' or left-click). All levels before the error can be played without problems but because Marbles stopped parsing further levels does not exist.

    Changing to such a non-existing level might result in an infinite loop. But when you are finished with creating your levelset no errors or warnings should occur! (If you run Marbles in an xterm errors and warnings will be displayed.)

    Screenshots.


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    TORCS is a highly portable multi platform car racing simulation.

    Tuesday, January 10, 2012

    TORCS, The Open Racing Car Simulator is a highly portable multi platform car racing simulation. It is used as ordinary car racing game, as AI racing game and as research platform. It runs on Linux (x86, AMD64 and PPC), FreeBSD, MacOSX and Windows. 

    The source code of TORCS is licensed under the GPL ("Open Source"). You find more information about the project in the menu bar on the left. If you need help have a look at the FAQ first. You can contact us on the torcs-users mailing list (you need to subscribe to use it).

    TORCS features more than 50 different cars, more than 20 tracks, and 50 opponents to race against. Your can steer with a joystick or steering wheel, if the device is supported by your platform. It is also possible to drive with the mouse or the keyboard. Graphic features lighting, smoke, skidmarks and glowing brake disks. 

    The simulation features a simple damage model, collisions, tire and wheel properties (springs, dampers, stiffness, ...), aerodynamics (ground effect, spoilers, ...) and much more. The gameplay allows different types of races from the simple practice session up to the championship. Enjoy racing against your friends in the split screen mode with up to four human players.

    TORCS was initially written by Eric Espié and Christophe Guionneau, substantial parts have been added by other contributors (have a look into the "Credits" section for details). The TORCS source code is licensed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL), most of the artwork is licensed under the Free Art License, have a look into the packages for details about copyright holders and the licensing. 

    Download.

    Linux Binary with Installer (1.3.0):


    This binary is dynamically linked, be aware that it is possible that this does not work on your system. If you try it anyway please report any problems or as well successful installs, such that we can improve it (without feedback this is not possible, of course the installer works on our systems). You can get it here. Install it with "torcs-1.3.0-linux-glibc-2.3-pIII.bz2.run". To resolve missing dynamic libraries you can run "torcs -l" (have a look at the command line options). It requires at least a Pentium 3 compatible CPU to run. 

    For Linux and FreeBSD from "all-in-one" Source Package:

    1. Check the dependencies
    2. Download the source package torcs-1.3.1.tar.bz2.
    3. Unpack the package with "tar xfvj torcs-1.3.1.tar.bz2".
    4. Run the following commands:
      $ cd torcs-1.3.1
      $ ./configure        # --prefix="target dir", --enable-debug or --disable-xrandr might be of interest
      $ make
      $ make install
      $ make datainstall
      
      Default installation directories:
      • /usr/local/bin - TORCS command (directory should be in your PATH)
      • /usr/local/lib/torcs - TORCS dynamic libs (directory MUST be in your LD_LIBRARY_PATH if you don't use the torcs shell)
      • /usr/local/share/games/torcs - TORCS data files
    5. Run the "torcs" command (default location is /usr/local/bin/torcs), you can use those command line options.
      All the configuration data, race results and players options will be saved below the $HOME/.torcs directory.
     For Linux From Separated Source Packages.

    1. Check the dependencies
    2. Download the following source packages:
    3. Unpack the packages (tar xvfz filename.tgz)
    4. Run the following commands:
      $ cd torcs-1.3.1
      $ ./configure        # --prefix="target dir", --enable-debug or --disable-xrandr might be of interest
      $ make
      $ make install
        
      Default installation directories:
      • /usr/local/bin - TORCS command (directory should be in your PATH)
      • /usr/local/lib/torcs - TORCS dynamic libs (directory MUST be in your LD_LIBRARY_PATH if you don't use the torcs shell)
      • /usr/local/share/games/torcs - TORCS data files
    5. Download the following data packages:
    6. Go to the /usr/local/share/games/torcs or "target dir"/share/games/torcs directory.
    7. Untar the data packages.
    8. Run the "torcs" command (default location is /usr/local/bin/torcs), you can use those command line options.
      All the configuration data, race results and players options will be saved below the $HOME/.torcs directory.
    For more detailed installation instructions have a look at Bernhard "Berniw" Wymann's site

    Linux From Sources CVS.


    You'll need those dependencies

    Getting the sources.

    You have to run the following commands to get the sources (might sometimes not compile or crash):
    cvs -d:pserver:anonymous@torcs.cvs.sourceforge.net:/cvsroot/torcs login

    The 1.3.1 trunk is:

    cvs -z3 -d:pserver:anonymous@torcs.cvs.sourceforge.net:/cvsroot/torcs co -r r1-3-1 -P torcs

    Get more info on CVS.

     


    Compiling.

    Run the following commands:
    $ cd torcs/torcs
    $ ./configure        # --prefix="target dir", --enable-debug or --disable-xrandr might be of interest
    $ make
    $ make install
    $ make datainstall
          

    Default installation directories:
    • /usr/local/bin - TORCS command (directory should be in your PATH)
    • /usr/local/lib/torcs - TORCS dynamic libs (directory MUST be in your LD_LIBRARY_PATH if you don't use the torcs shell)
    • /usr/local/share/games/torcs - TORCS data files


    Run the "torcs" command (default location is /usr/local/bin/torcs), you can use those command line options.
    All the configuration data, race results and players options will be saved below the $HOME/.torcs directory. 

    Dependencies.

    Requisites for Linux
    You will need:

    Screenshots.







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