Ubuntu is composed of many software packages, the vast majority of which are distributed under a free software license. The only exceptions are some proprietary hardware drivers.The main license used is the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL) which, along with the GNU Lesser General Public License (GNU LGPL), explicitly declares that users are free to run, copy, distribute, study, change, develop and improve the software. On the other hand, there is also proprietary software available that can run on Ubuntu. Ubuntu focuses on usability, security and stability. The Ubiquity installer allows Ubuntu to be installed to the hard disk from within the Live CD environment, without the need for restarting the computer prior to installation. Ubuntu also emphasizes accessibility and internationalization to reach as many people as possible.

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Pixelize, create an image consisting of many small images

Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Pixelize is a program that will use many scaled down images to try to duplicate, as closely as possible, another image.

Pixelize works by splitting up the image you want rendered (or duplicated) into a grid of small rectangular areas. Each area is analyzed, and replaced with an image chosen from a large database of images. Pixelize tries to pick images that best match each area.

Pixelize is a program I wrote that will use many scaled down images to try to duplicate, as closely as possible, another image.

Pixelize works by splitting up the image you want rendered (or duplicated) into a grid of small rectangular areas. Each area is analyzed, and replaced with an image chosen from a large database of images. Pixelize tries to pick images that best match each area.

Pixelize works best when it can choose images from a very large database of images. With about 1000 images, Pixelize can do a reasonable job.

Here are some example images that Pixelize has created shown next to the original: (These were created using a database of about 2500 images.)

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Pixelize is written in C and uses the GIMP Toolkit (GTK) and the Imlib library on top of X11. Pixelize was developed under Linux but has also been tested under SunOS and Solaris. It should work with almost any UNIX, though.

Here is what Pixelize looks like when first started:

Try it out. Download Pixelize (current version 1.0.0):

  • Download (via FTP)
  • Download (via HTTP)

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